China and the Americas: Risks and Rewards

April 14, 2021

Eric Farnsworth

China’s entry in the Americas represents the single biggest shift in hemispheric affairs this century. Much of Latin America now counts China as its first or second trade partner, and investment has increased dramatically. The covid pandemic has accelerated China’s efforts across the region further. Meanwhile, the United States has increasingly warned emerging markets worldwide of the risks of “corrosive capital” and the implications of economic and political linkages with Beijing. Why the concern? And what do policy makers, observers, and citizens need to know about China’s continued regional embrace?

Eric Farnsworth has led the Washington office of the Council of the Americas and the Americas Society since 2003, during which time the stature and influence of the organization has grown significantly. He maintains an important thought leadership and advocacy role across the broad range of issues affecting the Western Hemisphere, including U.S. relations, economic development, trade, and energy; Asia-Latin American relations and global governance issues; security; and democracy. He is a widely-sought after conference speaker and media commentator, and has published numerous articles and opinion pieces in leading newspapers and policy journals.

Mr. Farnsworth began his career in Washington with the US Department of State. During his time in government he served in positions of increasing responsibility in the foreign policy and trade communities, from Western Hemisphere Affairs at State to the Office of the US Trade Representative, culminating in a three and a half year appointment as the senior advisor to the White House Special Envoy for the Americas. In this capacity he played an important role in developing and implementing the administration’s policies toward the Western Hemisphere.

Previously, Mr. Farnsworth was managing director of Manatt Jones Global Strategies, an advisory and strategic consulting group. He also worked in the global public policy division of Bristol-Myers Squibb, and in the US Senate with Sam Nunn (D-GA) and the US House of Representatives with John Edward Porter (R-IL). In 2016 he was decorated by the King of Spain for his work to promote bilateral and regional relations.

The Speaker

Eric Farnsworth
Eric FarnsworthVice President, Council of the Americas and the America Society
Eric Farnsworth has led the Washington office of the Council of the Americas and the Americas Society since 2003, during which time the stature and influence of the organization has grown significantly. He maintains an important thought leadership and advocacy role across the broad range of issues affecting the Western Hemisphere, including U.S. relations, economic development, trade, and energy; Asia-Latin American relations and global governance issues; security; and democracy. He is a widely-sought after conference speaker and media commentator, and has published numerous articles and opinion pieces in leading newspapers and policy journals.

Mr. Farnsworth began his career in Washington with the US Department of State. During his time in government he served in positions of increasing responsibility in the foreign policy and trade communities, from Western Hemisphere Affairs at State to the Office of the US Trade Representative, culminating in a three and a half year appointment as the senior advisor to the White House Special Envoy for the Americas. In this capacity he played an important role in developing and implementing the administration’s policies toward the Western Hemisphere.

Previously, Mr. Farnsworth was managing director of Manatt Jones Global Strategies, an advisory and strategic consulting group. He also worked in the global public policy division of Bristol-Myers Squibb, and in the US Senate with Sam Nunn (D-GA) and the US House of Representatives with John Edward Porter (R-IL). In 2016 he was decorated by the King of Spain for his work to promote bilateral and regional relations.

China and the Americas: Risks and Rewards2021-04-08T09:56:22-07:00

The US and China: A Fragile Relationship Under Stress

November 1, 2018

 Henry (Hank) A. Levine

In late September, the US-Chinese relationship took a turn for the worse in economic and national security terms. What happened? What is the state of play and what does this mean for US companies and other American businesses in terms of trade with our single largest trading partner? What is the state of the Chinese economy? Are the Trump administration’s tariff wars justified? Are they effective? Or has the relationship between these two giants soured so much that economic disagreements also affect national security and other interests?

Henry (Hank) A. LevineHank Levine is a Senior Advisor with the Albright Stonebridge Group — a strategic advisory firm in Washington, DC. As a senior member of the firm’s multimillion-dollar China practice Mr. Levine helps international firms deepen their interactions with government and non-government entities in China and resolve business issues.

Before entering the private sector Mr. Levine spent 25 years as a Foreign Service Officer with the US Department of State. In this capacity he served twice in the State Department’s Office of China Affairs, twice at the US Embassy in Beijing, and as US Consul General in Shanghai. Following his tour in Shanghai he served for three years as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia at the US Department of Commerce. In that capacity he was the senior China advisor to two secretaries of Commerce and lead negotiator for the annual US-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade.

Mr. Levine is a member of the National Committee on US China Relations and a member of the Advisory Council of the US-China Education Trust, where he previously served as Executive Director. Mr. Levine has a B.A. in Political Science from Bucknell University. He did graduate work in international affairs at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He is a graduate, with distinction, from the US National War College. He is fluent in Chinese (Mandarin).

Time: 12-2 pm

Location:

The Hotel Santa Fe (#Kiva C),
1501 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, NM 87501

The US and China: A Fragile Relationship Under Stress2019-05-01T14:20:25-07:00

How China’s Banks Work: A Prism for Understanding China

Americans have difficulty comprehending how and why China works the way it does, giving rise to increasing friction between the two countries. This lack of understanding extends to China’s banking system, which is a microcosm of China’s political economy. Contrary to much media reporting, China’s banks have been transformed over the past 15 years into modern financial institutions. At the same time, shaped by centuries of Chinese institutions and values, and deeply embedded in the Chinese market socialist political economy, Chinese banks fundamentally differ from Western banks. Chinese banks play a dual role– provide shareholders with return on investment (the market role) and support the party-state’s national development agenda (the socialist role).

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How China’s Banks Work: A Prism for Understanding China2019-05-01T14:20:26-07:00

The US and Southeast Asia: The Challenging Times Continue

Just in the past year, the political and economic atmosphere in mainland Southeast Asia – from Myanmar to Vietnam – has dramatically shifted. Myanmar’s “Arab spring” has faded, economically prosperous Thailand has succumbed to political control by a military junta, and still Communist Vietnam is locked in a fierce contest with China over disputed islands in the South China Sea. In April 2012, the Santa Fe World Affairs Forum devoted its two day symposium to an exploration of US-Asian relations. This month’s session by Asian specialist Ambassador Will Itoh explores the changes that have subsequently taken place in Asia’s dynamic Southeast corner and their implications for the US.

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The US and Southeast Asia: The Challenging Times Continue2019-05-01T14:20:27-07:00
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