About Deepak Maharjan

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Deepak Maharjan has created 46 blog entries.

Restricted Data: The History of Nuclear Secrecy in the United States

May 19, 2021

Alex Wellerstein, author of Restricted Data, professor and Director of the Science and Technology Studies Program at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey.

The American atomic bomb was born in secrecy. From the moment scientists first conceived of its possibility to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and beyond, there were efforts to control the spread of nuclear information and the newly discovered scientific facts that made such powerful weapons possible. The secrecy that the atomic bomb appeared to demand was new, unusual, and nearly unprecedented. It was foreign to both American science and American democracy—and potentially incompatible with both.

This secrecy was controversial and always contested. The atomic bomb was not merely the application of science to war, but the result of decades of investment in scientific education, infrastructure, and global collaboration. If secrecy became the norm, how would science survive?

Drawing on troves of declassified files, in Restricted Data, Alex Wellerstein traces the complex evolution of the US nuclear secrecy regime from the first whisper of the atomic bomb through the mounting tensions of the Cold War and into the early twenty-first century.

Alex Wellerstein, is author of Restricted Data: The History of Nuclear Secrecy in the United States (University of Chicago Press, 2021). He is a professor and the Director of the Science and Technology Studies Program at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. He received a PhD from the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University in 2010, and has a BA in History from the University of California, Berkeley. Along with his writings in the New Yorker, Washington Post, Harper’s Magazine, and other venues, he is best known for creating the NUKEMAP, a popular online nuclear weapons effects simulator.

The Speaker

Alex Wellerstein
Alex WellersteinAauthor of Restricted Data, professor and Director of the Science and Technology Studies Program at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey
Alex Wellerstein, is author of Restricted Data: The History of Nuclear Secrecy in the United States (University of Chicago Press, 2021). He is a professor and the Director of the Science and Technology Studies Program at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. He received a PhD from the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University in 2010, and has a BA in History from the University of California, Berkeley. Along with his writings in the New Yorker, Washington Post, Harper’s Magazine, and other venues, he is best known for creating the NUKEMAP, a popular online nuclear weapons effects simulator.

Restricted Data: The History of Nuclear Secrecy in the United States2021-05-10T02:07:45-07:00

Reinventing the Transatlantic Relationship for the 21st Century

May 05, 2021

David O’Sullivan, former EU Ambassador to the US

This Zoom meeting is in cosponsorship with the Colorado European Union Center of Excellence and the German American Chamber of Commerce in Colorado.

After the difficulties of the last four years, the arrival of President Biden in the White House offers new hope for transatlantic relations. He and his very impressive team have always been committed Atlanticists. This presents a unique opportunity to redefine the relationship and, above all, to reshape it in a way which provides bulwarks against future shocks. But the challenges are considerable. On both sides of the Atlantic, domestic issues are to the fore: the pandemic, economic recovery and the need to build greater social consensus. And the US and the EU do not always share either a common analysis of global trends such as the rise of China or a common prognosis of how to respond. So, what will this new relationship look like, what will be its principal components and what are the chances of success?

David O’Sullivan served as Ambassador of the European Union Delegation to the United States from November 2014 until February 2019. Prior to his appointment as Ambassador, he was the Chief Operating Officer of the EU’s new diplomatic service, the “European External Action Service”. He had previously held a number of senior positions within the European Commission including Director General for Trade (2005-2010); Secretary General of the European Commission (2000-2005); and Chief of Staff to Commission President Romano Prodi (1999-2000). Before joining the Commission, he started his career with the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (1977-1979). He is a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin and the College of Europe (Bruges), and holds Honorary Doctorates from the Dublin Institute of Technology and Trinity College Dublin. He was awarded the EU Transatlantic Business Award by the American Chamber of Commerce in 2014.

This program has the support of the Erasmus Programme of the European Union and Jean Monnet in the USA.

The Speaker

David O'Sullivan,
David O'Sullivan,Former EU Ambassador to the US
David O’Sullivan served as Ambassador of the European Union Delegation to the United States from November 2014 until February 2019. Prior to his appointment as Ambassador, he was the Chief Operating Officer of the EU’s new diplomatic service, the “European External Action Service”. He had previously held a number of senior positions within the European Commission including Director General for Trade (2005-2010); Secretary General of the European Commission (2000-2005); and Chief of Staff to Commission President Romano Prodi (1999-2000). Before joining the Commission, he started his career with the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (1977-1979). He is a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin and the College of Europe (Bruges), and holds Honorary Doctorates from the Dublin Institute of Technology and Trinity College Dublin. He was awarded the EU Transatlantic Business Award by the American Chamber of Commerce in 2014.

Reinventing the Transatlantic Relationship for the 21st Century2021-04-30T00:19:20-07:00

Latin America: It’s Complicated

April 28, 2021

 Charles Shapiro, US Ambassador (rtd) and President of the World Affairs Council Atlanta

Since the end of the Second World War, US focus on Latin America has been intermittent and inconsistent. It has been intense when we perceived Latin America as part of the Cold War rivalry or when the US private sector saw opportunity. We have been inattentive when we saw other parts of the world as more important or more threatening. Of course, it is Latin America and Latin Americans who are going to resolve their own problems. The United States can help Latin Americans move toward more prosperous, democratic and inclusive societies.

Here is a link to a map of Central and South America which Ambassador Shapiro has asked us to share with you to draw attention in particular to the immense size of the continent as well as to point out that Latin America is substantially further East than North America.

Charles Shapiro is president of the World Affairs Council of Atlanta and a senior lecturer at the Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University. During his 34-year career at the U.S. Department of State, he held a number of senior positions including Ambassador to Venezuela, Acting Assistant Secretary for the Western Hemisphere, and Coordinator for Cuban Affairs. Shapiro’s postings include Venezuela, Chile, Trinidad and Tobago, El Salvador and Denmark. His op-eds have been published in the Los Angeles Times, the Miami Herald, The San Diego Union Tribute and most recently the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

The Speakers

Charles Shapiro
Charles ShapiroUS Ambassador (rtd) and President of the World Affairs Council Atlanta
Charles Shapiro is president of the World Affairs Council of Atlanta and a senior lecturer at the Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University. During his 34-year career at the U.S. Department of State, he held a number of senior positions including Ambassador to Venezuela, Acting Assistant Secretary for the Western Hemisphere, and Coordinator for Cuban Affairs. Shapiro’s postings include Venezuela, Chile, Trinidad and Tobago, El Salvador and Denmark. His op-eds have been published in the Los Angeles Times, the Miami Herald, The San Diego Union Tribute and most recently the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Latin America: It’s Complicated2021-04-30T00:31:44-07:00

Brazil: Dictatorship, Democracy and Disease

April 21, 2021

 Joëlle Uzarski  & Francisco“Paco” Perez

Brazil is one of the world’s most vibrant, multicultural, and ethnically diverse nations. It is the fifth largest by area and seventh most populous, and the planet’s lungs lie mostly within its frontiers. Brazilians joke that theirs is the country of the future, and always will be. Is this changing? Uzarski and Perez will present a brief introduction to Brazil’s history, government, economy, and people. They will address the U.S.-Brazil bilateral relationship, and then focus on how the COVID-19 pandemic has forced traditional diplomatic models and practices to evolve.

Joëlle Uzarski is currently the Public Diplomat in Residence at the Center on Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California. She joined the U.S. Foreign Service in 2005 following a two-year State Department Senior English Language Fellowship in Uzbekistan. She served overseas at the U.S. embassies in Brazil, Chile, India, Pakistan, and Thailand, where she directed State Department educational and cultural programs in 19 countries. Her most recent assignment was Country Cultural Affairs Officer in Brasilia.  Prior to becoming a diplomat, Joëlle trained teachers and taught students in Korea, Brazil, and Spain.  She earned her B.A. in Creative Writing and her Master’s in Applied Linguistics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  She is from Chicago.

Francisco “Paco” Pérez grew up in Belen, New Mexico and is currently the Public Affairs Officer for the U.S. Consulate General in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He joined the State Department in 2008, following a fellowship with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus on Capitol Hill. He has served in Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Panama, Benin, and the Department of State, Operations Center. He and his wife, FSO Stephanie Espinal are members of the Hispanic Employees Council of Foreign Affairs Agencies (HECFAA) and have participated in many recruiting events for future Hispanic Foreign Service Officers. Paco is a graduate of the University of Tampa and has a juris doctor degree from the University of New Mexico School of Law.

The Speakers

Joëlle Uzarski
Joëlle Uzarski Public Diplomat in Residence at the Center on Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California
Joëlle Uzarski is currently the Public Diplomat in Residence at the Center on Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California. She joined the U.S. Foreign Service in 2005 following a two-year State Department Senior English Language Fellowship in Uzbekistan. She served overseas at the U.S. embassies in Brazil, Chile, India, Pakistan, and Thailand, where she directed State Department educational and cultural programs in 19 countries. Her most recent assignment was Country Cultural Affairs Officer in Brasilia.  Prior to becoming a diplomat, Joëlle trained teachers and taught students in Korea, Brazil, and Spain.  She earned her B.A. in Creative Writing and her Master’s in Applied Linguistics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  She is from Chicago.
Francisco “Paco” Pérez
Francisco “Paco” PérezPublic Affairs Officer for the U.S. Consulate General in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Francisco “Paco” Pérez grew up in Belen, New Mexico and is currently the Public Affairs Officer for the U.S. Consulate General in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He joined the State Department in 2008, following a fellowship with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus on Capitol Hill. He has served in Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Panama, Benin, and the Department of State, Operations Center. He and his wife, FSO Stephanie Espinal are members of the Hispanic Employees Council of Foreign Affairs Agencies (HECFAA) and have participated in many recruiting events for future Hispanic Foreign Service Officers. Paco is a graduate of the University of Tampa and has a juris doctor degree from the University of New Mexico School of Law.

Brazil: Dictatorship, Democracy and Disease2021-04-14T21:23:25-07:00

China and the Americas: Risks and Rewards

April 14, 2021

Eric Farnsworth

China’s entry in the Americas represents the single biggest shift in hemispheric affairs this century. Much of Latin America now counts China as its first or second trade partner, and investment has increased dramatically. The covid pandemic has accelerated China’s efforts across the region further. Meanwhile, the United States has increasingly warned emerging markets worldwide of the risks of “corrosive capital” and the implications of economic and political linkages with Beijing. Why the concern? And what do policy makers, observers, and citizens need to know about China’s continued regional embrace?

Eric Farnsworth has led the Washington office of the Council of the Americas and the Americas Society since 2003, during which time the stature and influence of the organization has grown significantly. He maintains an important thought leadership and advocacy role across the broad range of issues affecting the Western Hemisphere, including U.S. relations, economic development, trade, and energy; Asia-Latin American relations and global governance issues; security; and democracy. He is a widely-sought after conference speaker and media commentator, and has published numerous articles and opinion pieces in leading newspapers and policy journals.

Mr. Farnsworth began his career in Washington with the US Department of State. During his time in government he served in positions of increasing responsibility in the foreign policy and trade communities, from Western Hemisphere Affairs at State to the Office of the US Trade Representative, culminating in a three and a half year appointment as the senior advisor to the White House Special Envoy for the Americas. In this capacity he played an important role in developing and implementing the administration’s policies toward the Western Hemisphere.

Previously, Mr. Farnsworth was managing director of Manatt Jones Global Strategies, an advisory and strategic consulting group. He also worked in the global public policy division of Bristol-Myers Squibb, and in the US Senate with Sam Nunn (D-GA) and the US House of Representatives with John Edward Porter (R-IL). In 2016 he was decorated by the King of Spain for his work to promote bilateral and regional relations.

The Speaker

Eric Farnsworth
Eric FarnsworthVice President, Council of the Americas and the America Society
Eric Farnsworth has led the Washington office of the Council of the Americas and the Americas Society since 2003, during which time the stature and influence of the organization has grown significantly. He maintains an important thought leadership and advocacy role across the broad range of issues affecting the Western Hemisphere, including U.S. relations, economic development, trade, and energy; Asia-Latin American relations and global governance issues; security; and democracy. He is a widely-sought after conference speaker and media commentator, and has published numerous articles and opinion pieces in leading newspapers and policy journals.

Mr. Farnsworth began his career in Washington with the US Department of State. During his time in government he served in positions of increasing responsibility in the foreign policy and trade communities, from Western Hemisphere Affairs at State to the Office of the US Trade Representative, culminating in a three and a half year appointment as the senior advisor to the White House Special Envoy for the Americas. In this capacity he played an important role in developing and implementing the administration’s policies toward the Western Hemisphere.

Previously, Mr. Farnsworth was managing director of Manatt Jones Global Strategies, an advisory and strategic consulting group. He also worked in the global public policy division of Bristol-Myers Squibb, and in the US Senate with Sam Nunn (D-GA) and the US House of Representatives with John Edward Porter (R-IL). In 2016 he was decorated by the King of Spain for his work to promote bilateral and regional relations.

China and the Americas: Risks and Rewards2021-04-08T09:56:22-07:00

Democratic Backsliding in Latin America: What Can the Biden Administration Do?

April 07, 2021

Dr. Eduardo Gamarra

Academics, policymakers, and pundits alike have warned that democracy in the region is backsliding. Concern is voiced not just about left leaning regimes such as Bolivia, Nicaragua, and Venezuela but also about right leaning ones such as Brazil, Colombia, and El Salvador. This trend poses a significant challenge to the Biden Administration which must respond to this backsliding in an unprecedented context.

Eduardo A. Gamarra is a tenured full professor of political science in the department of politics and international relations at Florida International University. He has been at FIU since 1986 where he also directed the Latin American and Caribbean Center LACC from 1994 to 2007. In February 2016 he was appointed founding director of the Latino Public Opinion Forum at the Stephen Green School of International and Public Affairs.

Gamarra obtained his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Pittsburgh in 1987. At Pitt, Gamarra worked under the mentorship of James M. Malloy, one of the leading experts on Bolivia and the Andes. With Malloy he wrote his first book entitled Revolution and Reaction: Bolivia 1964-1984. He has since written, co-written or co-edited twelve books and nearly one hundred scholarly articles on the Latin American and Caribbean Affairs.

The Speaker

Dr. Eduardo Gamarra
Dr. Eduardo GamarraProfessor Florida International University
Dr. Eduardo Gamarra is a tenured full professor of political science in the department of politics and international relations at Florida International University. He has been at FIU since 1986 where he also directed the Latin American and Caribbean Center LACC from 1994 to 2007. In February 2016 he was appointed founding director of the Latino Public Opinion Forum at the Stephen Green School of International and Public Affairs.

Gamarra obtained his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Pittsburgh in 1987. At Pitt, Gamarra worked under the mentorship of James M. Malloy, one of the leading experts on Bolivia and the Andes. With Malloy he wrote his first book entitled Revolution and Reaction: Bolivia 1964-1984. He has since written, co-written or co-edited twelve books and nearly one hundred scholarly articles on the Latin American and Caribbean Affairs.

Democratic Backsliding in Latin America: What Can the Biden Administration Do?2021-04-04T23:08:31-07:00
Load More Programs