November 15, 2013

We are living through an unprecedented decline in deaths of children worldwide from preventable diseases.  U.S. foreign aid played a central role in this little-known story.
Around the world 6 million fewer children will die this year than in 1990. This global effort has been collaborative, but such success would not have happened except for U.S. foreign aid, which is only 1{fe681502a50b39155a3ca75d1ea8a550fe0ee8275f6f89ef466f508ac0f80879} of the federal budget.  Yet as much progress has been made in global health, 18,000 children will die today, mainly from diseases that are preventable.

We are living through an unprecedented decline in deaths of children worldwide from preventable diseases.  U.S. foreign aid played a central role in this little-known story.
Around the world 6 million fewer children will die this year than in 1990. This global effort has been collaborative, but such success would not have happened except for U.S. foreign aid, which is only 1{fe681502a50b39155a3ca75d1ea8a550fe0ee8275f6f89ef466f508ac0f80879} of the federal budget.  Yet as much progress has been made in global health, 18,000 children will die today, mainly from diseases that are preventable.

The Speakers

David DouglasDirector of Advocates for Development Assistance
David Douglas heads Advocates for Development Assistance which focuses on the results of US poverty-focused foreign aid. He also founded Water Advocates, the nation’s first advocacy organization devoted to increasing Congressional and private-citizen funding for clean drinking water and basic sanitation internationally. He has headed for 25 years the all-volunteer Santa Fe-based nonprofit, Waterlines, which has provided technical aid and funding for drinking water projects in 700 rural communities in developing countries. Douglas is the author of Wilderness Sojourn: Notes in the Desert Silence and with his wife, Deborah, of Pilgrims in the Kingdom: Travels in Christian Britain.

Where

St. John’s College, Junior Commons Room. On November 13, 2013, from 12:00 noon to 2:00 pm

Sold Out

Parking

The Visitors Parking Lot is on your left as you enter campus. A few handicapped parking spaces are located at the Visitor’s Circle right in front of the fishpond area and below the Peterson Student Center. A few more are located behind the Peterson Center as follows. Just before the Visitor’s Circle, look for the fork in the road where you would normally drive to the left to get to the Visitors’ Parking Circle just below the Peterson Center. Instead, turn right and follow the drive up to the other parking area. There are two or three handicapped parking spaces on the left. Please note that this parking lot is not open to the public, but handicapped folks are allowed to park in the designated spaces.